Smart Home Devices

Source: SANS security tip
Now adays most of us have numerous devices in our homes connect to the Internet. From thermostats and gaming consoles to baby monitors, door locks or even your car. Ensure you change the default passwords on these devices and enable automatic updating.
Smart Home Devices

Search Yourself Online

Source: SANS security tip
Ever wonder just how much information is publicly available about you? Ever wonder how cyber criminals harvest information and customize attacks for their victims. The technique is called Open Source Intelligence (OSINT) and it is far simpler and more powerful than you think.
Search Yourself Online

Phone Call Attacks

Source: SANS security tip
More and more scams and attacks are happening over the phone. Whenever you get an urgent phone call on the phone pressuring you to do something (such as a caller pretending to be the tax department or Microsoft Tech Support) be very suspicious. It’s most likely a scammer trying to trick you out of money or pressure you into making a mistake. Protect yourself, simply hang up the phone. You are not being rude, the person on the other line is trying to take advantage of you.
Phone Call Attacks

USB Drives

Source: SANS security tip
Be very careful of any lost USB drives you may find (such as in the parking lot or local coffee shop) or USB drives you are given at public events, like conferences. It is very easy for these devices to be infected with malware. Never use such devices for work, use only authorized devices issued to you by work.
USB Drives

Never Try to Fix the Problem When Hacked

Source: SANS security tip
Eventually, we all get hacked. The bad guys are very persistent and we can all make a mistake. If you suspect you have been hacked never try to fix the situation, instead report it right away. If you try to fix the situation, such as paying an online ransom or deleting the infected files, not only could you stil be hacked but you are most likely causing far more harm than good.
Never Try to Fix the Problem When Hacked

Clues You Have Been Hacked

Source: SANS security tip
Some of the most common indicators that you may have been include the following. Your friends tell you that they have received odd emails or messages from you, messages you know you did not send. Your password no longer works for one of your accounts, even though you know you never changed the password. Your anti-virus informs you that one of your files or computer is infected. You receive a pop-up message informing you that the files on your computer have been encrypted and you must pay a ransom to recover them.
Clues You Have Been Hacked

Don't Trust Links Sent in Email Messages

Source: SANS security tip
A common method cyber criminals use to hack into people’s computers is to send them emails with malicious links. People are tricked into opening these links because they appear to come from someone or something they know and trust. If you click on a link, you may be taken to a site that attempts to harvest your information or tries to hack into your computer. Only click on links that you were expecting. Not sure about an email? Call the person to confirm they sent it.
Don’t Trust Links Sent in Email Messages

Go With Passphrases

Source: SANS security tip
Passphrases are the strongest type of passwords and the easiest to remember. Simply use an entire sentence for your password, such as “What time is coffee?” By using spaces and punctuation, you create a long password that is hard to guess but easy to remember.
Go With Passphrases

Email Auto-Complete

Source: SANS security tip
Be careful with email auto-complete. This is an email feature that automatically completes a name for you when you begin typing it in the TO field. However, your email client can easily complete the wrong name for you. If you are emailing anything sensitive, always be sure to check the TO field a second time before hitting the send button.
Email Auto-Complete